Let’s Not Forget Our History: Vets Share the Lessons

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Joseph Ambrose, an 86-year-old World War I veteran, attends the dedication day parade for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. He is holding the flag that covered the casket of his son, who was killed in the Korean War.

Quick! We have to teach history before it’s destroyed around us. Every day, Dems seem to either want to destroy the monuments that remind us of where we came from as a nation or want to rewrite history so that it isn’t offensive.

Guess what? History has to be not only remembered but taught. It’s the only way we can remember how great our nation is. Without history, we’re only destined to make the same mistakes.

Luckily, we can always count on our vets to steer us in the right direction. While liberal savages choose to tear down historical monuments, the sons of the Tuskegee Airmen choose to share history lessons with students.

Howard Baugh grew up in Petersburg, Virginia being told that he could never fly a plane because of the color of his skin. That changed, however. He was in the cockpit in 1942, preparing for World War II. While he was part of a segregated fleet, he also helped to make history – later becoming part of an elite group known as the Tuskegee Airmen.

Baugh had two sons – Howard and Richard. Now, these two men help to share that history and the incredible story with groups of students and their teachers at the Virginia War Memorial. They tell the story of what their father was able to accomplish along with other black airmen.

While Howard Baugh died in 2008, his legend lives on not only with his sons but with everyone who hears the story. Howard L. Baugh says that it’s important to share the story of his father with as many as possible. Too many Tuskegee Airmen had stories that were untold – and what the black men did to help with World War II should never be forgotten. They were legends, though too many people have no idea how they contributed to their country.

Baugh is one to ensure that students learn all about American history – including the important part that blacks have played. Black History Month is a time when they make sure to share some of their research and talk about things that may not have made it into every history book out there.

Many people have no idea who the Tuskegee Airmen were and what important roles they played. With 355 pilots and more than 1,000 successful missions, they were vital in World War II – and their story deserves to be told.

Baugh has brought the story of his father and the other pilots out to those not only in schools but also prisons and churches.

While other blacks complain about not having their history told and choose to spend their time marring statues that tell that history, others, like Baugh, are making sure that the history is told. He is doing something constructive by providing a true education – and more people need to be like this veteran.

In a country that is being ripped apart from the inside out, it’s becoming racially charged again. Black Lives Matter protesters are wanting to pit blacks against whites. One side yells that black lives matter while the other side yells that all lives matter.

Why not show how all lives matter by telling stories of history? Let’s show how all lives matter and how some black lives made a significant impact?

Leave it to the veterans to get it right. They’ve already seen enough bloodshed in a lifetime to know that violence is not the answer. In the story of Howard Baugh, it doesn’t matter whether he is a Democrat or a Republican. It doesn’t matter whether he voted for Trump or for Clinton. For him, what matters is being able to tell the story of his father and the glory of the Tuskegee Airmen.

Listen up, protesters. Put down your weapons. Take note of how a veteran does it. Rather than protesting, educate. Volunteer your time and teach kids what history needs to be remembered to make this country great again.

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